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Fresh Images Spark Further Inquiries Into Fatal Aconcagua Expedition

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Fifty years ago, an expedition to climb the Aconcagua, one of the mightiest mountains in the world, ended in tragedy with two climbers dying and their bodies left behind. Now, a camera belonging to one of the deceased climbers has emerged from a receding glacier, shedding light on one of mountaineering’s most enduring mysteries.

The camera belonged to Janet Johnson, one of the climbers who perished, and was discovered by two porters as they prepared for an upcoming expedition near the summit of Aconcagua. The camera had a shattered lens and was found with the body of Janet Johnson, along with her belongings. The discovery sparked interest in the legend of Janet Johnson and John Cooper, who were part of the ill-fated expedition.

The Aconcagua is the highest mountain in the Western Hemisphere, and the first person to reach its summit was Matthias Zurbriggen of Switzerland in 1897. Aconcagua is part of a state park and is considered among the easiest to climb of the Seven Summits, but still poses dangers with 153 known deaths on the mountain. The ill-fated American expedition to Aconcagua in 1973 was made up of eight climbers, with their leader being Carmine Dafoe.

The discovery of Janet Johnson’s camera and belongings from the receding glacier set off renewed interest in the events of the 1973 expedition and the enduring mystery surrounding Johnson and Cooper’s deaths. The findings have provided more clues and shed light on a long-lost legend. The tragic events of the expedition had been whispered like a ghost story for years, and now, the emergence of the camera brought the mystery to the forefront once again.

The discovery has reignited the interest in the expedition and the storied lives of Janet Johnson and John Cooper, and continues to captivate the imagination of those interested in mountaineering and adventure. The search for answers to the events of the 1973 expedition will likely continue to intrigue for years to come.

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Photo credit www.nytimes.com

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